Resources

21 results found

Education programs to foster water sensitive leaders

The integrated approach behind successful water sensitive city outcomes requires organisations to foster new types of skills in future water leaders. The attached resource describes research on what and how water professionals want to learn, including insights from interviews with…
Author
  • Date Published: 1st Nov 2017

The climatic benefits of green infrastructure

Research shows that vegetation, especially trees, can  effectively mitigate urban heat. To achieve human health  and comfort benefits, it is particularly important to reduce  temperatures during heat waves. The attached Industry Note summarises CRC for Water Sensitive Cities research on…
Author
  • Date Published: 1st Nov 2017

Design of the public realm to enhance thermal comfort

Improving thermal comfort in the public realm lifts the amenity of these areas and provides  specific human health benefits. The attached Industry Note summarises research on how  to: • identify thermal comfort investment priorities; and • design thermally comfortable outdoor…
Author
Location
  • Date Published: 1st Nov 2017

Cost-effective Strategies to Reduce Nitrogen and Phosphorus Emissions in an Urban River Catchment

Emissions of nitrogen and phosphorus from various sources into urban waterways cause algal  blooms and generally degrade delicate aquatic ecosystems. Perth’s Canning River is a prime example,  and yet protecting it from these emissions has been a policy challenge for…
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  • Date Published: 16th Oct 2017

Valuing the benefits of local stormwater management

Introduction How much is the community willing to pay for additional improvements of local stormwater management? Which benefits are valued the most? Are these preferences reflected in current public policy? A recent study has found that the community places a very high…
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Locations
  • Date Published: 9th May 2017

The impact of short-term weather variations on the valuation of local stormwater management projects

Introduction Do recent weather conditions affect the community’s willingness to pay for the benefits associated with local stormwater management projects? For example, is the public willing to pay more for flood protection following a period of heavy rain? Does it…
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  • Date Published: 9th May 2017

Changing water habits after drought: Why garden watering was easier to change than showering

Summary Past experience has shown that communities can change habits and reduce water use during times of crisis but a critical question is whether these habits persist after the crisis and why? Social practice theory can be used to answer…
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Locations
  • Date Published: 24th Jan 2017

CRCWSC Industry Note (2016): Benchmarking Water Sensitive Cities

Supportive social and institutional frameworks are a key part of facilitating the transformation towards increased water sensitivity. Three complementary qualitative benchmarking tools have been developed to assist urban water policy makers and strategists identify current water management practice and future…
Project
  • Date Published: 1st Dec 2016

CRCWSC Industry Note (2016): How can social norms be leveraged to promote water sensitive cities?

What innovative, non-price approaches are available to manage water demand? How can current conservation programs be modified to better promote water savings, particularly amongst high-use households? Is there a way to harness people’s pre-existing beliefs and motivations in order to…
Project
  • Date Published: 1st Dec 2016

CRCWSC Industry Note (2016): Water and the Australian city: lessons from history

Most Australians live in suburban, single-family, detached houses. This historical and continuing housing preference means that providing water and sewerage services are expensive. Australians have traditionally been profligate with water, but have always shown remarkable willingness to adapt water usage…
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Locations
  • Date Published: 1st Dec 2016

CRCWSC Industry Note (2016): The real problem of hypothetical bias in the valuation of stormwater management projects

Stated preference methods provide an important means of assigning monetary values to non-market goods and services but they suffer from a significant problem: hypothetical bias. That is, people’s tendency to overstate their willingness to pay in hypothetical scenarios. However, a…
Project
  • Date Published: 1st Dec 2016

CRCWSC Industry Note (2016): Allowed use and security: Community preferences for new water supply sources

When considering which new water supply sources to invest in it is helpful to understand what matters to the community. For example, is the public concerned about water sources that depend on the weather or unfamiliar technologies? Is there support…
Project
  • Date Published: 1st Dec 2016

Water-related jargon: How much does the community understand?

Abstract Communicating effectively with local citizens is an essential part of changing  household behaviours, such as promoting shorter showers, and building public  support  or new policies and technologies. Many commonly used water terms, such  as riparian, biofiltration and ‘urban heat…
Project
  • Date Published: 30th Sep 2016

Reducing household water use – which behaviours should be prioritised?

Abstract Households have the capacity to generate significant reductions in water use. There are many water-saving behaviours that households can adopt - but some have a greater impact on water use than others. Which household behaviours should demand-reduction campaigns prioritise?
Project
  • Date Published: 1st Feb 2016
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